IsumaTV

A place to store all the things we didn't put on our own website.
lastrealindians:

By Ang Ster

Beautiful native artwork. Angela Sterritt is an artist and a journalist. Her father is Gitxsan from Gitanmaax, and her mother was from Newfoundland. She recently worked on a film project called Your Courage about the missing and murdered Aboriginal women, where her large acrylic paintings would be turned into an animated short. More of her art is visible on her Flickr stream.

lastrealindians:

By Ang Ster

Beautiful native artwork. Angela Sterritt is an artist and a journalist. Her father is Gitxsan from Gitanmaax, and her mother was from Newfoundland. She recently worked on a film project called Your Courage about the missing and murdered Aboriginal women, where her large acrylic paintings would be turned into an animated short. More of her art is visible on her Flickr stream.

(via moniquill)

"Inuit Pikutingit" — "What Belongs to Inuit"

A film by Zacharius Kunuk and Bernadette Dean.

A group of Nunavut elders travel to five museums in North America to see and identify artifacts, tools and clothing collected from their Inuit ancestors.

This video game, made by native Alaskans under the auspices of the Cook Inlet Tribal Council, looks beautiful. The main player character is an Iñupiaq girl (so also bonus points for gender representation!), too.

Find out more here, and see some more gorgeous videos of the game!

This new Australian anti micro-aggressions ad highlights the kind of racism indigenous Australians face…all day, every day. It’s a difficult ad to watch, especially if you’re used to this kind of microaggression yourself.

"Red Warrior" — from the Haida Community Page over at isuma.tv

Words by Michaela McGuire

Video by EVIL Patrick Shannon

5centsapound:

Nadia Myre, Indian Act

Indian Act speaks of the realities of colonization - the effects of contact, and its often-broken and untranslated contracts. The piece consists of all 56 pages of the Canadian Federal Government’s Indian Act mounted on stroud cloth and sewn over with red and white glass beads. Each word is replaced with white beads sewn into the document; the red beads replace the negative space.

Every time I see this artwork, it hits me right in the heart. 

theprocessofchasing:

String bag.  New Guinea, West Sepik (Sandaun) Province, upper Sepik River, Telefol region, Mountain Ok people 20th century Fiber, feathers, shell, skin

So gorgeous.

theprocessofchasing:

String bag.  New Guinea, West Sepik (Sandaun) Province, upper Sepik River, Telefol region, Mountain Ok people
20th century
Fiber, feathers, shell, skin

So gorgeous.

(Source: highlands.famsf.org, via )

zuky:

I snapped these pics of a temporary exhibit at the Museum of Anthropology, titled “Speaking To Memory: Images and Voices from St. Michael’s Residential School”, an Indian residential school in Alert Bay, BC, which operated from 1929 to 1974 in the project of forced assimilation and cultural eradication. As is now widely understood, these schools often became hellholes of cultural, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse of Native children at the hands of white adults, a multi-generational trauma whose pain remains a long road ahead.

During the late 1930s, one student at the school had a camera and she took photographs of many of her classmates. She recently donated these images to the museum, resulting in this exhibit. The old school building remains standing, in deteriorating condition, and photos of its now-decrepit interiors create a haunting backdrop to displayed items, which include statements from hundreds of students at the school, passages of government reports, formal apologies from various churches and government bodies for their role, as well as an ongoing invitation for more statements and information from visitors who were either residential school students or knew anyone who was. It’s a somber, dimly lit exhibit, and I could hear sobs from people taking it in. 

(via ayiman)

danceswithjoints:

As a Mi’kmaq women, I am so proud of my people standing up against the destruction of our earth. Please join us in solidarity, mother earth needs us. 

What a powerful image.

danceswithjoints:

As a Mi’kmaq women, I am so proud of my people standing up against the destruction of our earth. Please join us in solidarity, mother earth needs us. 

What a powerful image.

The reports of our cultural deaths have always been greatly exaggerated

apihtawikosisan:

So this is a pretty long article, FUSE Magazine gave me the chance to really let ‘er go word-wise. However, if you’ve ever wondered why Indigenous people feel that language is SO important, this article might help you understand the issue. The article originally appeared in an apocalypse-themed issue. I chose to refute the idea that Indigenous peoples are facing an apocalypse in the ‘traditional’ sense of “about-to-die-off”.

By the way, featured in the article is Vincent Medina, whose tumblr blog you can find here: http://ohlone.tumblr.com/

Apihtawikosisan’s latest article! Go Chelsea!

(via apihtawikosisan-deactivated2014)